Posts Tagged ‘wall sheathing’

 

Understanding R-value and U-value
Jul 5, 2017 | Posted in Builders, Dealers, DIY, Framers

Knowing what R-value and U-values mean is key to following energy issues and to selecting products that best suit the climate zone you are building in. R-value is essentially a product’s resistance to heat flow. Adversely, U-value measures the rate of heat transfer. This means that products with a lower U-value will be more energy efficient. It is tempting to think that these two values are direct opposites of each other, but there are some important differences to note.

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Minimize moisture content on your wall sheathing?
May 3, 2017 | Posted in The Ol' Sage Builder

Did your wall sheathing get wet? Well, best listen to the Ol’ Sage Builder regarding the maximum moisture content before closing up your walls.

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Is installing Windstorm horizontally a good idea?
Jan 16, 2017 | Posted in The Ol' Sage Builder

Thinking about installing your Windstorm panels horizontally? Is it even possible? You best check in with the Ol’ Sage Builder before starting that project, he’ll set you right!

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Sealing Air Leaks in your Building Envelope
Jan 13, 2017 | Posted in Builders, Dealers, DIY, Framers

As homeowners strive to reduce their monthly costs, construction professionals are finding innovative ways of reducing air leakage.

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QuakeZone: Buildings that Can Withstand Earthquakes
Dec 12, 2016 | Posted in Builders, Dealers, DIY, Framers, Podcast

QuakeZone provides a continuous load path which, when used with a professional designer’s fastener schedule, meets building code and helps withstand the kinds of shear forces your home is subjected to during an earthquake.

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Plywood or OSB Panels: Which is better?
Sep 19, 2016 | Posted in Builders, Dealers, DIY, Framers

Both OSB and plywood wood panels can be used for wall sheeting, sub-flooring panels and roof panels, but OSB has some advantages

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Taller Wall Sheathing Makes Walls Stronger
Aug 18, 2016 | Posted in Builders, Dealers, DIY, Framers

Innovative manufacturers like Norbord that think outside the box have flipped the structural sheathing panels for vertical installation and increased their height. Longer wall sheathing like TallWall enables an overlap at the joists which eliminates hinge points to increase wall strength. Longer sheathing also reduces the number of seams which improves energy efficiency and makes for a stronger, smoother, flatter wall.

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Norbord’s Onsite App Helps Reduce Callbacks and Costs
Aug 17, 2016 | Posted in Builders, Dealers, DIY, Framers

Norbord’s Onsite app helps prevent mistakes and reduces construction time. Onsite enables builders, framers, and DIYers to work effectively with all their OSB products.

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Building for High Wind Events
Jul 19, 2016 | Posted in Builders, Dealers, DIY, Framers

While it’s more difficult to build structures that resist higher impact storms from EF-3 to EF-5, modern technologies and a better understanding of shear and uplift forces is making it possible to construct homes that survive even violent storms.

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Installing Longer Wall Panels Vertically
May 2, 2016 | Posted in The Ol' Sage Builder

Can you install our longer OSB Wall sheathing panels vertically? Well, of course you can and the Ol’ Sage lets you know why you should.

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Taller Wall Panels Reduce Air Leakage
Mar 31, 2016 | Posted in Builders, Dealers, DIY, Framers

As construction costs increase and building codes demand more effective building envelopes, construction professionals are looking to taller wall panels to fill in the gaps. OSB wall panels already make for a sustainable and cost-effective option but with longer length OSB wall panels, the efficacy of the building envelope is increased by creating fewer seams while costs, waste and installation time are reduced.

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A Cost-Effective Solution to Combined Shear and Uplift Winds
Mar 23, 2016 | Posted in Builders, Framers

Homes built in high-wind areas must be able to withstand the wind forces known as uplift (which try to roll the structure over) and shear (which tries to push the structure sideways). Catastrophic damage to property and tragic loss of life have prompted industry professionals to look for cost-effective ways to build homes better able to withstand combined shear and uplift using products trades are familiar with. Now structural wall sheathing can provide the required continuous load path needed to resist high winds and meet high wind codes.

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